Modernity in South Asia (part 2)

(continued from part 1) To this day, Marxist anthropologists (Thorner 1982; Patanaik 1990) have described India as neither capitalist nor feudal, but having elements from both, i.e. ‘semi-capitalism’ or‘semi-feudalism’.  Likewise, European historians, from the advent of the British Raj, saw Indian history between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries in a global perspective, thereby insinuating that … Continue reading Modernity in South Asia (part 2)

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Is Hinduism a Religion? (part 2)

(continued from part 1) In order to comprehend 'Hinduism' fully, we must unveil its origins. This brings us to our next variable, geographic location.  The famous words of the Anglo-Welsh philologist Sir William Jones, have given scholars clues as to the primeval origins of Hinduism’s sacred language, Sanskrit: 'The Sanscrit language, whatever be its antiquity, … Continue reading Is Hinduism a Religion? (part 2)

The Issues of lexical borrowing for comparative reconstruction throughout Indo-Iranian languages (part 2)

(continued from part 1) It is usually the case that languages exist in a dialect chain, with high degrees of congruency between adjacent dialects.  This results in replication being so extensive as to cover entire linguistic areas, meaning an entire language area can effectively use the same lexicon, making subgrouping almost impossible.  This is exemplified … Continue reading The Issues of lexical borrowing for comparative reconstruction throughout Indo-Iranian languages (part 2)

The Issues of lexical borrowing for comparative reconstruction throughout Indo-Iranian languages (part 1)

Comparative reconstruction and subgrouping is done as if on the presumption that languages neatly separate into clearly demarcated dialects, which have neither subsequent contact with each other after separation, nor with other unrelated languages. When applying the comparative method, one must be aware not only of sound correspondences and inherited changes within a language or … Continue reading The Issues of lexical borrowing for comparative reconstruction throughout Indo-Iranian languages (part 1)